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We arent “good Canadians” if we were opposed to sending troops to Iraq

Yup, thats right, folks, according to Christopher Sands of the Center For Strategic and International Studies, the majority of Canadians weren’t “good” because we didn’t support sending troops to the Iraq war, or supported the idea behind the US going.

Now how did we find this out? Well, Macleans magazine had a journalist down at the Hudson Institute, who had the privilege of listening to our (in my opinion) most buffoonish Minister in the Cabinet (even some Conservatives I know think he’s not that bright), Public Security Minister Stockwell Day.

And how did Stockwell day get introduced by Christopher Sands? In a manner described by the reporter as revealing a bit of the lingering inside-the-beltway attitudes toward Canada, Iraq war disasters notwithstanding, and she refers to this:

“I was struck back in 2003 after doing a briefing with some people in the Administration. It had been a rough year. We were getting ready to go to Iraq. Canada-US relations were somewhat strained by that. At the end of the briefing — which had been a little bit grim — about how Canada and the US could work together better in this war on terror that we were facing, the person I was was briefing paused and said to me, ‘Chris, where are all the good Canadians?’ When he said that it broke a little bit of my heart, because I’m an American but I love the Canadians. I think what he meant by that was ‘Where are the Canadians of World War I and World War II, that people understood to be… even when Europeans didn’t, those allies we had come to count on.’ Well, I have good news. Our speaker today is one of the good Canadians…

What Christopher Sands is referring to of course is that Stockwell Day’s Conservative Party, led by then opposition leader- now Prime Minister Stephen Harper – was the only party that supported sending troops to Iraq in support of the “coalition Of The Willing”. Harper was bitterly denouncing Prime Minister Jean Chretien and the Liberals every day while this was all going on.

Now of course, you’d never ever hear a peep about that in Canada nowadays, because people like Harper and Day want Canadians to forget what they were advocating at the time. Its good though that people like Christopher Sands are out there though to remind us all of what people like Day and Harper were advocating. That should come handy as a good quote during the next election campaign.

I didnt know much about this Center of Strategic Studies… so I went to study up on it, and found that amongst its board members are Henry Kissinger and Brent Sowcroft.. and it was also a sponsoring organization for the Iraq Study Group.

At any rate, I just wanted to apologize to my US readers for being a “bad Canadian” (one of many I might add). I’m glad there are a few “good ones” left for neo-cons like Christopher Sands to laud.

By the way, after I read this tripe, I decided to write an email to Chris Sands, and it read:

Chris.. in reference to this story about ‘where all the good Canadians were’, you had one good Canadian you neglected to mention – Prime minister Jean Chretien.. who had the foresight to see your Iraq adventure was a disaster in the making and wisely kept us out of that quagmire.

That people like you can resent us for making the right decision is remarkable. The fact you laud Stockwell Day further strains your credibility – he’s seen as a buffoon, even amongst some of his Conservative Party colleagues

For those Canadians (and maybe Americans too) who would like to differ with Mr Sands on what a “good Canadian” was or is, here is the page of his bio at CSIS, and you will see an email link there to write the “expert” on Canadian politics, which to me seems anything but after reading this nonsense.

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12 comments to We arent “good Canadians” if we were opposed to sending troops to Iraq

  • Of course they are, presumably, “the good Americans.”

  • I have good American friends who bitterly, bitterly opposed this. Perhaps this is about them.

  • Jason Townsend said:
    [quote comment=”920″]Let’s bear in mind that a majority of Americans oppose this war. [/quote]

    Let’s also bear in mind that when the war started, a majority of Americans supported going to Iraq.. and we had to endure daily talk shows on CNN and such bemoaning “why Canada didn’t join and support us?”.

    There were also stories down my way in the local newspaper of Canadians getting their cars vandalized when they went across the border to get something or to shop or whatever because if this decision to stay out of it, so let’s not completely excuse this lingering attitude or dismiss it as the views of a few.. there were a lot more where this came from 4 years ago.

  • Who the hell are they to lecture us about being reliable allies after sitting on their cans for the opening chapters of both of those wars

    Let’s bear in mind that a majority of Americans oppose this war. It may well be that some Americans, perhaps even many Americans have a dysfunctional notion of what constitutes international friendship, but we ought not reply with similar national anthropomorphizations.

  • Being a good Canadian, or human being for that matter, hasn’t a thing to do with your support for any war. Supporting the current military action in the Middle East is wrong-headed and is based on misguided foreign policy and the need for the US to dictate how those in foreign lands live.

  • Here is further evidence of Stockwell Day’s buffoonery. It’s even penned by the Chretien sycophant Lawrence Martin: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/Page/document/v5/content/subscribe?user_URL=http://www.theglobeandmail.com%2Fservlet%2Fstory%2FLAC.20061104.COMARTIN04%2FTPStory%2FTPComment%2FPolitics%2F&ord=1169259343505&brand=theglobeandmail&force_login=true

    Did you include in your email to Sands that you are a member of the Liberal Party? It might have put things in context.

  • Hey Ex-NDIP:

    I’m going to ignore your attempts to take the thread off-topic and ask you this simple question – which should generate a simple answer:

    Were you one of Chris Sands “good Canadians” who supported sending troops to Iraq?

    Yes or no.

  • Great minds think alike – you beat me to it. I think emailing this Sands fella is a great idea. I also find his WWI and WWII analogy offensive. Who the hell are they to lecture us about being reliable allies after sitting on their cans for the opening chapters of both of those wars…

  • Ex-NDIP

    Anyone remember the bank in France that handled all the funds from the Oil-for-Food scam???? It was part of “Power Corp” the great LPC benefactor . . . even has been said that some of the Cretch’s relatives worked there . . . could that have had an influence on the outrage of the French and the Cretch re: Iraq. The gravey train would end . . . kind of like soooooo liberal!!!!

  • Whooee! I didn’t believe you at first, MatthewFeller, but I looked it up at wikipedia an’ yer right as rain, no two ways. So howcum, when our MP’s voted against joinin’ the EyeRack campaign, do we end up with Canajun army men there anyway? Howcum HappyJack ain’t screamin’ bloody murder in teh House o’ Comments? Howcum I hadta find out from a comment at Scottie’s boog?

    These CSIS guys’s got their heads up their hinders. Anybuddy who’s still sayin’ today that the EyeRack invasion was a good idea don’t have much of a grip on reality. They sure as hell shouldn’t oughta be callin’ ’emselves foreign policy experts. Experts don’t make collossal blunders.

    Macleans’ Paul Wells is yammerin’ ’bout Harpoon’s support fer the war.

    JimBobby

  • We do have troops in Iraq. They’re called Joint Task Force 2 and they have worked there along side the SAS and Delta for so time now.

  • If supporting the Iraq war makes you a good Canadian, let me just say how proud I am to be “bad to the bone”.

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